Fast Facts

Stacie A. Salsbury, PhD RN

 

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Topics in Integrative Health Care 2013, Vol. 4(3)   ID: 4.3005



Published on
September 30, 2013
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Readers are welcome to contribute to Fast Facts. Please include the original abstract (with citation) that is the source of your contribution. Contributors’ names will be included along with the item.


A recent survey of 18 Association of Chiropractic Colleges institutions evaluated the use of chiropractic teaching clinics by patients who are not English language proficient and assessed available language translation resources. The percentage of patients who were not English language proficient averaged 12.5%. Nearly 75% of non-English language proficient patients spoke Spanish as a primary language, and an additional 19.5% of patients spoke Asian languages. Over 55% of surveyed colleges did not offer language-specific treatment consent forms and only 33% had a policy to address language discordance in their teaching clinics. Only one college reported employing a professional translator while most relied on multi-lingual staff to address this gap. The author concludes that chiropractic colleges should develop policies to address the communication needs of the non-English language proficient patients who receive care in chiropractic teaching clinics. The free full text article is available at: http://www.chiromt.com/content/21/1/7

Saporito RP. English language proficiency and the accommodations for language non-concordance amongst patients utilizing chiropractic college teaching clinics. Chiropr Man Ther 2013; 21(7).

A 12-week randomized, parallel group dosing trial of once- or twice-weekly hatha-style yoga class plus home yoga practice significantly decreased chronic low back pain in people of non-white minority background who reported low annual incomes. There were no differences in back pain or function between the once- or twice-weekly groups. The highest level of benefit was recorded at 6-weeks for both groups. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of yoga for treating chronic low back pain in diverse, low-income populations. The free full text article is available at: http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2013/658030/abs/

Saper RB, Boah AR, Keosaian J, Cerrada C, Weinberg J, Sherman KJ. Comparing once- versus twice-weekly yoga classes for chronic low back pain in predominantly low income minorities: a randomized dosing trial. Evidence-Based Complementary Altern Med 2013, Article ID 658030.

This review examines recent research and current hypothesis on the role of predisposing factors, biomechanical processes, immune activation and inflammation in the onset and progression of osteoarthritis. Knee osteoarthritis is presented as an exemplar of the condition. The full-text article is available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3638313/.

Sokolove J, Lepus CM. Role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis: latest findings and interpretations. Therapeutic Adv Musculoskeletal Dis 2013;5(2):77-94.

This narrative review describes research on the role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as heart disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke. Five broad categories of CAM are considered including biologically-based treatments, mind-body therapies, manipulative and body-based practices, whole medical systems, and energy medicine techniques. The free full-text article is available at: http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2013/672097/.

Rabito MJ, Kaye AD. Complementary and alternative medicine and cardiovascular disease: an evidence-based review. Evidence-Based Complementary Altern Med 2013 Volume 2013, Article ID 672097.



Contributed by


Stacie A. Salsbury, PhD, RN

Clinical Project Manager, Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research
Davenport, IA, USA

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