Fast Facts

THIC Staff

 


Topics in Integrative Health Care 2014, Vol. 5(1)   ID: 5.1005



Published on
March 27, 2014
Text Size:   (-) Decrease the text size for the main body of this article    (+) Increase the text size for the main body of this article
Share:  Add to TwitterAdd to DiggAdd to del.icio.usAdd to FacebookAdd to GoogleAdd to LinkedInAdd to MixxAdd to MySpaceAdd to NewsvineAdd to RedditAdd to StumbleUponAdd to Yahoo

Readers are welcome to contribute to Fast Facts. Please include the original abstract (with citation) that is the source of your contribution. Contributors’ names will be included along with the item.


The purpose of this study was to develop evidence-based treatment recommendations for the treatment of nonspecific (mechanical) neck pain in adults. Interventions commonly used in chiropractic care improve outcomes for the treatment of acute and chronic neck pain. Increased benefit has been shown in several instances where a multimodal approach to neck pain has been used. Free full text available at: http://download.journals.elsevierhealth.com/pdfs/journals/0161-4754/PIIS0161475413002376.pdf

Bryans R, Decina P, Descarreaux M, Duranleau M, Marcoux H, Potter B, Ruegg RP, Shaw L, Watkin R, White E: Evidence-based guidelines for the chiropractic treatment of adults with neck pain. J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2014, 37:42-63.

There are currently no widely accepted guidelines on standards for the practice of chiropractic or manual therapy manipulation under anesthesia, and the evidence base for this practice is composed primarily of lower-level evidence. The purpose of this project was to develop evidence-informed and consensus-based guidelines on spinal manipulation under anesthesia to address the gaps in the literature with respect to patient selection and treatment protocols. Free full text available at: http://www.chiromt.com/content/pdf/2045-709X-22-7.pdf

Gordon R, Cremata E, Hawk C. Guidelines for the practice and performance of manipulation under anesthesia. Chiropr Man Ther 2014, 22:7. DOI: 10.1186/2045-709X-22-7.

Baseline depression was associated with a worse outcome in chiropractic patients with low back pain. Free full text available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3902415/pdf/2045-709X-22-4.pdf

Kongsted A, Aambakk B, Bossen S, Hestbaek L: Brief screening questions for depression in chiropractic patients with low back pain: identification of potentially useful questions and test of their predictive capacity. Chiropr Man Therap 2014, 22:4.

It is possible to differentiate people from the general population as having or not having episodes of LBP using the definition of absence of LBP over one month as the measure. Non-episodes were far more common in the general population than in the secondary care sector. Free full text available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3892070/pdf/2045-709X-22-1.pdf

Leboeuf-Yde C, Lemeunier N, Wedderkopp N, Kjaer P: Absence of low back pain in the general population followed fortnightly over one year with automated text messages. Chiropr Man Therap 2014, 22:1.

Cognitive interviews identified wordings with considerable agreement among both participants and investigators. Some items widely used in clinical studies had different meanings to participants than investigators, or were confusing to participants. The final 18-item questionnaire is undergoing psychometric evaluation with goals of streamlining as well as identifying best items for use when questionnaire length is constrained. Free full text available at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/14/39

Sherman KJ, Eaves ER, Ritenbaugh C, Hsu C, Cherkin DC, Turner JA: Cognitive interviews guide design of a new CAM patient expectations questionnaire. BMC Complement Altern Med 2014, 14:39.



Contributed by


TIHC Staff

Share:  Add to TwitterAdd to DiggAdd to del.icio.usAdd to FacebookAdd to GoogleAdd to LinkedInAdd to MixxAdd to MySpaceAdd to NewsvineAdd to RedditAdd to StumbleUponAdd to Yahoo