Fast Facts

THIC Staff

 


Topics in Integrative Health Care 2015, Vol. 6(1)   ID: 6.1007



Published on
March 31, 2015
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Readers are welcome to contribute to Fast Facts. Please include the original abstract (with citation) that is the source of your contribution. Contributors’ names will be included along with the item.


Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is associated with improved depressive symptoms regardless of affiliation with a religion, sense of spirituality, trait level of mindfulness before MBSR training, sex, or age. Increases in both mindfulness and daily spiritual experiences uniquely explained improvement in depressive symptoms.

Greeson JM, Smoski MJ, Suarez EC, et al. Decreased Symptoms of Depression After Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction: Potential Moderating Effects of Religiosity, Spirituality, Trait Mindfulness, Sex, and Age. J Altern Complement Med. Feb 19 2015.

Current interventions that direct patients in self-care management of symptoms and associated challenges with cancer/survivorship are helpful, but incomplete. No one intervention can be recommended over another. Guiding patients with cancer in self-care management is important for overall functional status and quality of life. Further investigation and tailored interventions are warranted.

Hammer MJ, Ercolano EA, Wright F, Dickson VV, Chyun D, Melkus GD. Self-management for adult patients with cancer: an integrative review. Cancer Nurs. Mar-Apr 2015;38(2):E10-26.

The Integrative Wellness Program (IWP) at the University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center (SCCC) sought to provide integrative wellness education to cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers by offering instruction in exercise, nutrition, and complementary and alternative medicine. The significant improvements detected related to dietary habits, combined with the responses from the participant satisfaction surveys, suggest that the IWP was well received and can positively impact the overall wellness of cancer patients, survivors, and their caregivers.

Stoutenberg M, Sogor A, Arheart K, Cutrono SE, Kornfeld J. A wellness program for cancer survivors and caregivers: developing an integrative pilot program with exercise, nutrition, and complementary medicine. J Cancer Educ. Feb 10 2015.

The MTs shared tacit knowledge that directed their work: a) maintaining a primarily biomechanical focus, b) prerequisite safe touch, c) multitasking not allowed, d) MTs assume physical risk, and e) the work affects multiple bodily systems. The MTs sensed effectiveness experientially by adopting common tactics: a) visualizing the manual engagement points, b) assuming the client controlled the physiological release, and c) educating the client. Within these commonalities, they operationalized their work in complex and singular ways, with the particular client relationship critical to structuring the session and evaluating the outcome. MTs viewed their work primarily as a biomechanical intervention, but understood therapeutic massage as serving multiple functions. Process-oriented clinical reasoning mirrored models found in psychotherapy and was informed by experience, intuition, and training, which resulted in an intentionally holistic approach.

Fortune LD, Hymel GM. Creating integrative work: A qualitative study of how massagetherapists work with existing clients. J Bodyw Mov Ther. Jan 2015;19(1):25-34.




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TIHC Staff

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